Posted in authors, Books, bookshelf, Food mysteries, Food Writing, Libraries, Little Free Library, Mysteries, mystery authors, news, NYTimes.com, Uncategorized, writing

Q Is For Quirky

Q Is For Quarry is the name of a Sue Grafton mystery that I passed by on my walk the other day. I have a new route that takes me past a Little Free Library.

For those not in the know, Little Free Libraries are very small, wooden structures perched on top of a post. Passerby are encouraged to take –or leave– a book.

The previous week I had left Gone Girl, which I picked up about two months ago from another Little Free Library. It was quite riveting, but I was ready to part with it, so I dropped it off. I was curious whether anyone else had picked it up or had left any other books.

Q Is For Quarry caught my eye. It was a hardback. It beckoned to me. I opened the little Little Free Library Door, but wasn’t sure if I’d like it. I am very particular about mysteries and gravitate toward those involving food (my favorite authors are Joanne Fluke and Ellen Hart). I started to walk away, but the book called to me again. I thought about bringing it home. I thought of the other books waiting at home for me. I didn’t want to bring it home, only to neglect it.

Fast forward twelve hours. I was scanning headlines on nytimes.com to see if anything jumped out at me. One headline did. It read: “Sue Grafton, Whose Detective Novels Spanned The Alphabet, Dies At 77.”

How quirky to have had a special connection with her book only hours before. Perhaps her spirit wished to talk with me. When Sue Grafton was still alive, we had been in touch via snail mail. I had asked her a question. She typed a response and then kept me on her mailing list, sending holiday greetings every year. Recently she told her fans about her surgery and book tour cancellation; she enclosed a tiny flashlight like that her character, Kinsey Millhone, uses. I sent a thank you note and best wishes for her recovery. I keep the flashlight on my keychain for good luck. I am sad that she’s gone. I will miss her sweet cards.

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Posted in Books, books, bookshelf, children's books, funny, humor, Libraries, Uncategorized

Close Call

I had a harrowing experience at the library yesterday.

We have a program called Lucky Day; popular, new books are prominently displayed on the shelf and if it’s your lucky day, you’ll get to take some home, rather than wait on a list with 50 million others.

Lately, I’ve been finding good stuff, so I decided to look at it first thing. I found a memoir and a picture book. On a nearby shelf, I found another picture book.

I was planning to read the picture books upstairs, but when I discovered two books for me on the hold shelf, I put everything on the electronic check out device so that I could use my knapsack to carry everything.

Error message in red! It read: One or more books could not be checked out. I thought the red dots pointed to the picture books, so I read those upstairs as planned. Then I placed them on a shelving cart.

I took another look at the Lucky Day shelf before leaving. I found another book and checked it out.

Then I went through the gate.

Beeeeep! It flashed red and the security guard stopped me. He said I had to recheck out one of my books.

I tried, but got another error message. I brought the book to circulation. The circ. person said the problem was I had maxed out on my Lucky Day check outs. She named them and included one of the picture books.

That picture book was now on the shelving cart. What if someone reshelved it? What if another patron took it? What if someone took it home and didn’t return it on time and there was a late fee and I was charged? It would ruin my perfect record, my library reputation.

I raced upstairs to retrieve the picture book, then raced downstairs “Trade!” I said, handing it to the circ. person. She checked it in and presented me with the book I wanted.

Lucky day, indeed.

 

Posted in book discussions, book quotes, bookshelf, Fiction Excerpts, novels, Rachel Joyce, reading

A Novel Thought or Two

I’m reading The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy by Rachel Joyce, her marvelous sequel to the equally fabulous novel, The Unlikely Pilgramage of Harold Fry, and I had to share these two quotes:

p.60
“If only memory were a library with everything stored where it should be.”

p. 255
“I gather Finty has a thousand followers,” said a soft voice beside me. … “What do you do with a thousand followers?” [Mr. Henderson] settled into the chair beside mine. “I had a wife and a best friend. That was all I needed.”

Do you have favorite quotes from books?